May 19 2018

Olympus 35SP with Agfa Precisa Cross Processed

Olympus35SP-1667

I had a roll of Agfa Precisa 100 which is a slide film meant for E6 development however I opted to develop it in C41 color negative chemistry.  This is commonly referred to with the self explaining name ‘cross processing’  As with many things ‘film’ I like the somewhat random nature of the results.  Some images turned out with very little to tell them apart from an image processed normally to other images having severe colour shifts.  Part way through the roll I also opened up the back of the camera for a little bit of a light leak across some frames.  Doing this of course you loose some images and you risk ‘damaging’ what might have otherwise been a good image.  On the flip side you can get some interestingly effected images that would be hard to achieve any other way.   You might be able to get a faux light leak result with some photo manipulation but someone needs to create the baseline of what would happen in the real world.

The shift in colour was quite unpredictable as can be seen from these two images of the same sign.  The one on the left was taken shooting into the light and the one on the right was taken away from the light.  The shift towards green isn’t equal across the entire image but happens primarily in the blues of the sky.  That image is as scanned with no effort made to hide the effect through adjustments.

ColourShift

I’m happy with the results and continue to be enamored with the Olympus 35SP which has risen to be my favorite rangefinder camera.  More about this camera here Olympus 35 SP

While many people think of a 50mm lens on 35mm film as being the normal focal length that approximates what the human eye would see the actual diagonal of a 35mm film frame is around 43mm which means that the 42mm lens on the 35SP is much closer to the ideal normal lens than 50mm is.  One more reason the Olympus 35 SP is an awesome camera.

 


Apr 28 2018

Kodak Portra 160 in the Pentax MZ6

MZ6_wkoopmans-3902

While I enjoy using rangefinder and point and shoot cameras there is no doubt for versatility its the SLR that wins.  That’s why when I have the space and can spare the weight I like to bring along an SLR on trips.  In this case the camera was the Pentax MZ6 one of the last film SLR’s produced by Pentax and full of all the features you need in a small light package.

I haven’t shot much of the Kodak Portra 160 mostly because it seems like an odd sensitivity.  It has a Print grain index of 79 at a magnification ratio of 17.9 while Ektar is 66 and Portra 400 is 89.  With only a marginal improvement in granularity over the Portra 400 it makes choosing it more about needing the slower ISO at which point the Ektar comes into play.   Then the choice is more between their colour rendition the more punchy saturated  Ektar vs the more muted skin tone friendly Portra.


Apr 22 2018

Rollei CN200 in the Yashica GX

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Different films often say ‘load film in subdued light’ but few of them require it to the degree that Rollei CN200 does.  Each roll that I have shot so far has had ‘unwanted’ light strike the film while it is inside the canister.  I placed unwanted in quotes because I could have been more careful to prevent it if it really mattered to me more.  I like the randomness that can occur.  What appears to happen is that the tang of the film leader sticking out of the canister works like a light pipe allowing the film to transfer light from outside to inside.  The most clear evidence of this is the way that the first 12″ or so of the film is exposed to sunlight in a diminishing fashion.

yashicaGT_Agfa_Digibase200_002

The reason that this may occur with CN200 is it is an unmasked film.  Unlike most negative colour films it does not have the same orange brown color mask but its base is clear as you would see with slide film.  An interesting side effect of the lack of the normal C41 mask is that the film can be optically printed with Black and White paper the same as normal Black and White film.   A quick check on the Internet as of January 2018  and this film is not available through any retailers I can locate which is a shame.  Posts that actually talk about the Yashica Electro GX can be found by a search of my blog here “Yashica GX”


Feb 11 2018

Cinestill 800T and Seattle at night

PentaxMZ6-8665

I loaded my trusty Pentax MZ6 with some Cinestill 800t film which I really like the look of particularly for the way it creates halos around bright lights against dark backgrounds.  You can see my discussion around why that occurs here “Niagara at night“  Coupling the fast film with some equally fast lenses such as the Vivitar 28mm f2.0 Close Focus allows me to forgo a tripod even when walking around at night.


Oct 8 2017

Disposible film camera harvest

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Disposable cameras have their place but nestled inside them can be some fun random films.  I acquired a few similar disposable cameras of dubious quality so I decided to rip one open and pull out its heart.  Mentioned previously here Thrift Store DisposableDispossible_film-5387

The first thing you need to do though is get the film back into the canister.  The way that disposable cameras work is that rather than a separate rewind action all the film starts outside the canister and is wound back in as you advance the film.  I accomplished this, without taking unwanted pictures, by winding and tripping the shutter while the camera was inside my changing bag.  Any suitably dark sack will do or even a finger over the lens.

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With the expired Italian film recovered from the Chinese camera I put it into my Japanese Yashica GX and here is what I got shooting around my neck of the Canadian woods.

One last thing I found when taking the film out of the developing tank was that a short piece of dummy film was taped to the end presumably to maximize every piece of emulsion that gets exposed.

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Jan 22 2017

Canon A1 and Cinestill 800T a continued pairing

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As I have posted previously I really like using the Canon A1 for taking long low light exposures and I also like the halo around light sources that Cinestill 800 provides. So I keep pairing these two up like they are a couple.

One issue that has come up for me is the remnants of the ramjet removal has reared its head several times. It’s primarily seen in darker images. For this reason I will need to rethink the way I expose and scan this film. I’ve tended to perhaps under expose at times with the intention of highlighting lights in the scene but when scanned this seems to reveal the residue of the remjet. I had a particularly egregious example of this that Cinestill remedied by sending me replacement rolls

As I haven’t seen this issue from other users of the film I now have to conclude it is something I am doing. No other film is effected this way during my processing so it leaves me to believe that it is always there to a degree its just a matter of the ratio of it to the recorded image on the negative. If during scanning your trying to extract details from a thin negative then it is likely going to show. Because I still want to continue to use it for nocturnes I am going to increase the amount of exposure I do and see if I get a better result.

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It can be much worse than shown in the above image as well. But when it does work out I have been pleased with the look.

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Some more images from the same roll


Jan 14 2017

Really really really expired Kodak 100


While I often shoot with expired film I rarely will use a roll of film found inside an old camera. Who knows how many times its been exposed or the camera opened up just to look at the film. For some reason though I just thought why not with this roll that came inside my Canon A1. I knew that the front end of the roll had definitely been exposed to light as I had opened the camera myself with the film in it. So I skipped ahead 8 frames and started shooting it in my Pentax MZ6. Not wanting to commit too much time to a roll of film that in all likelihood wouldn’t result in a single image I used them all up during a short walk. Wow what a strange result. I’ve never seen such a strong colour shift, let’s call it violent violet or malevolent mauve. It reminds me a little of Lomochrome Purple but in this case it lays that purple blanket over everything rather than shifting colours around. In case your wondering if it was possibly the processing, this roll was done at the same time as another one that did not have any colour casts.

Lomochrome Purple gives results more like this.

OlyXA_LomochromePurple_Feb2015_035


Jul 31 2016

Developing film on a BBQ

I wanted to demystify the developing of colour film. It really is a matter of time and temperature…oh and keeping the film in the dark that’s important too. The film was some very old 110 Kodacolor II that I found in a thrift store camera and it turned out to not have any images on it but the processing itself wasn’t at issue. I’m not actually advocating using a BBQ for film developing but the point is that its not as hard as it seems. I used a Unicolor C41 kit which includes all the necessary instructions.

I shot the video with the Pentax K-3 in timelapse mode. The K-3 was set to take a picture every 2 seconds it then builds the sequence into a video clip in camera which is very convenient.


Jun 24 2016

Polaroid Spectra P-11

Jan2016_Polaroid_SpectraThis leaves me with 10 frames of Polaroid Spectra remaining although the quality has started to deteriorate.  This one is of an abandoned house  out in a rural area behind Mission BC.  Driving around I started to noticed that there were a lot of ‘Bavarian’ looking older houses tucked away here.  I’m not sure what the connection is other than houses on a mountain side.

 

 


Apr 28 2016

Canon A-1 with Ferrania Solaris

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This post is more about the film than the camera (Other Posts about the A-1 can be seen here).  I came into possession of two rolls of Ferrania Solaris via a thrift store.  I don’t know the age of it but it has to be outdated simply for the fact that Ferrania isn’t currently making film and haven’t for a while.  They are at this time making an effort to restart production in a new smaller plant  Film Ferrania.  I didn’t hold out that much hope for this film with its unknown provenance but unlike so many of my odd film experiences this exceeded my expectations it has a graininess to it similar to but more subtle than Adox color implosion while keeping the colours more realistic.
Grain
It ended up being quite contrasty but still retained details in the darks unlike many other outdated films I’ve encountered. I shot this roll on a drab dark day so maybe I will wait for a nice bright spring day to shoot the second roll. I wish Ferrania much success with getting their plant up and running whether they ever produce Solaris again or not.