Whalley Colour Photographs

Whalley-3759

I reached a point in my photographic series ‘Whalley’ that I felt warranted collecting into this book ‘Whalley – colour photographs’  .  I took most of the 80 images included in the book over several weeks in the summer of 2013.  The pictures were created using various cameras but all have that they were shot on colour film in common. Even though I limited myself to the neighbourhood of Whalley, in the larger City of Surrey BC, for this series the images themselves speak to the larger issue of change and location.  It just happens that Whalley is undergoing the most concentrated transformation. Collectively the images provide a snapshot of the area at this liminal moment.  It’s as if the neighbourhood is being willed into some new modern reality, even its name is being obscured by the usage of ‘City Center’ rather than the name ‘Whalley’. A name which carries many non positive connotations in the public perception.  I know for me the name doesn’t conjur images of small homes overlooking the Fraser River, even though that exists too.  My immediate reaction is to recall all the news stories of crime and drugs that I’ve heard repeatedly over many years.  As the visual recorder of this location I try not to impart too much of my personal biases into the work but in reality that is an impossibility. The fact of my presence here already alludes to that.  The mostly de-peopled pictures included in the book provide a certain distance between the viewer and the scenes much as if they were to walk around Whalley casting their gaze but never getting too close.

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8 Responses to “Whalley Colour Photographs”

  • Nikhil Ramkarran Says:

    That is an interesting collection Wallace, you do have a unique viewpoint. Makes for a good photobook. Seemed too brief though.

  • Wallace Says:

    The preview is only 15 pages the book though is 85 if that is what you might mean Nikhil

  • Charles Says:

    Hi, I’ve been enjoying reading your blog and, as someone developing a 35mm compact camera addiction your comments on different models are both entertaining and informative. I’m also impressed by your paintings. I’m replying to this entry for two reasons. I was born in Whalley, but that’s Whalley, Lancashire, England, and guessing by your comments and photos the Canadian version of the town is somewhat more gritty than the English version. However, my main motivation was to ask how satisfied your were with the reproduction quality of your blurb book. I have done a small blurb book using scanned 35mm negs from the 1980s and found the photos appeared a little muddy and subdued. I guess it pays to boost saturation and contrast over and above the adjustments you might normally make in the hope that the printed results look both balanced and quite punchy. I’ve been considering using the new blurb premium magazine format too, as it looks excellent value for money. Anyway, I’d certainly be very interested in your views on image quality in blurb books. Cheers.

  • Wallace Says:

    While I haven’t shopped around for self publishing options I would say that Blurbs results are better than avarage but not up to what you see with a traditionally published photobook. That said they are fine. I have some magazines that were published using MagCloud (ironically just bought by Blurb) and the quality is very good if not better than the Blurb books. This may be the format that I publish my next book in. Thank you regarding the paintings I am quite excited about this series and have just had some of them reproduced on metalic paper as a test and they look great that way. The files I used for the book I would say were properly exposed without any extra boost but I ensured that they all had good histograms with a lot of detail in both the dark and bright areas.

  • Charles Says:

    Thanks for your reply. That’s encouraging about the quality you’ve found with the magazines. They have the added bonus that they are much more affordable for those who want to buy a copy. Yes, I imagine checking histograms makes sense to ensure good colour, tone and detail. Incidentally, I’m expecting a black Konica Lexio 70W in the post which I purchased for the equivalent of about $14 on ebay. Looking forward to putting a roll of Fuji Superia 400 through it at the 28mm wide angle setting. I’ve read that the bokeh can be a little bit whacky but I don’t mind that. Fingers crossed it’s a good example with accurate AF and metering.

  • Charles Says:

    Oh, having said the above I’ve just noticed your Lexio review! We’ll see how mine works out. I’ve also just received a Konica Z-up 100w with a 28-100mm lens so I’ll try that one out too.

  • Wallace Says:

    I actually have a roll of film sitting for me to process from another Konica Lexio so I may be able to further confirm my suspicions about that lens. You may want to also have a look at my Konica Zup28W it is actually very good at 28mm

  • Charles Says:

    Just had a look at your Konica Zup28W review.Looks quite sharp at 28mm. Maybe just a little bit too big to carry around in a pocket. The Lexio is good in that respect, although not as compact as an Olympus mju II/Epic. I would be interested to hear your thoughts on the results with the second roll of film you put through the Lexio. I’ve started a roll in mine.

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